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Saturday, January 3, 2015

The Celestial Scribe

Hello to all of my old and new readers. Though I haven't posted new content in several years, I still appreciate those who stop in to read.

I want to introduce my latest creative endeavor called The Celestial Scribe. Through this new website I will post articles on the asteroids, planets and stars and offer narrative natal chart readings.

It was a joy writing about films, but my new focus shall be on Astrology.

Take care and Happy New Year!

Wednesday, February 4, 2009

Halle Berry Reigns as Alex Haley's Queen

During Valentine’s week in 1993, I had the pleasure to watch the 3 part mini-series adaptation of Alex Haley’s Queen. Although, I was merely 11 year-old at the time, I felt a strong connection and understanding of the pain of the characters. Perhaps it was the emergence of past life memories or just knowing that owning another person is wrong, whatever the case, the impact of this film was profound and still resonates with me today.



Set against the back drop of the pre-civil war south, Alex Haley’s Queen begins with the flirtation of Queen’s parents Col. James Jackson Jr. (Tim Daly) and his sewing slave, Easter (Jasmine Guy). They have known each other since childhood, yet their sexual chemistry begins to erupt.


However, the idea of James and Easter ever being more than Master and slave was a big HELL NO. Therefore, James reluctantly gives in to his mother’s pressure to marry the suitable Lizzie Perkins (Patricia Clarkson), two years after the birth of his first child, Queen (Raven-Symone as a child, Halle Berry as an adult).


When Queen turns 5-years old she goes to live with her father in the big house as a maid to her half-sister Jane.


The movie then jumps ahead to the beginning of the Civil War and Queen is now 20-years old. Throughout the remainder of part 1, Queen endures war-time horrors as those she loves succumb to death, injury and the loss of their familiar world.

***************************************************************************


As part 2 begins plantation life has been shattered forever. The slaves are freed and flee for a new beginning, while Queen struggles to find herself amidst a family that won’t claim her as their own.


Shown the cold shoulder by her step-mother and grandmother (Ann Margret), Queen fights to keep her sanity.


The day after a terrifying encounter and chase from two white customers at the Henderson’s, Queen decides to leave her old life behind.


As Queen wanders around searching for a place to belong, she struggles to fit into a world that sees her as neither white nor black.


Cold, hungry and poor, she poses as a white female just to get a meal and soon be-friends another biracial woman named Alice (Lonette McKee), who gets her a job in a flower shop.


She meets a white gentleman named Digby (Victor Garber) while working and they begin dating. However, when the truth of her real identity becomes known Queen is beaten and sexually violated.


Alone and depressed, Queen moves again, in search of love.


Happy to have a job as a maid for two religious sisters, Queen meets and falls in love with a black gardener/activist named Davis (Dennis Haysbert).


Queen soon learns she’s pregnant and decides to keep the baby after a frightening visit to an abortionist.


Although, Davis, promises to stand by her, he skips town instead, leaving Queen to give birth to Abner by herself.


Stuck between wanting to flee and needing a place for her child, Queen remains with her employers, until they become obsessed with Abner.

As part 2 draws to its close, Queen is on the run…



Part 3 opens with Queen meeting and being hired by Mrs. Benson to be her child’s wet nurse. While visiting in town, Queen runs into Davis and the two spend the night together.


Unfortunately, Mr. Benson is a member of the KKK.


Mr. Benson and his clan kidnap Abner and lynch his father, Davis, in front of him.


Heart-broken and exhausted, Queen runs away yet again.


As she’s riding on a ferry she meets a man named Alec Haley (Danny Glover).


Thanks to Alec, Queen begins working for Mr. Cherry as a maid.


Eventually Queen and Alec marry and add to their family with the birth of Isaac.


Throughout part 3 Queen is faced with mental illness and healing from her past, but this time she has the love of a good man and family to ease the process.


Alex Haley’s Queen is a wonderful piece of American cinema and history to be

treasured by people of all skin colors. Part 1 will premiere on the channel TV One on Sunday, February 8th, at 9 p.m., eastern time.


It was also released to DVD in 2008.


So this Black History month gather around, hold back the tears as the poignant musical score slowly bores a hole in your heart and watch the movie that helped introduce Halle Berry’s acting talents to the small screen.


You’ll be happy you did.

Monday, February 2, 2009

Pajama Party Flick Picks-February 02, 2009


Welcome to the February 2, 2009 edition of Pajama Party Flick Picks.

Vaprak presents Movie Review: The Unborn (2009) posted at The Critical Critics.



Mansur Ahmed presents The Dark Side of Comedians posted at Mansur Ahmed.








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Monday, January 26, 2009

Pajama Party Flick Picks-January 26, 2009


Welcome to the January 26, 2009 edition of Pajama Party Flick Picks.

Mansur Ahmed presents Academy Award Nominations 2009 posted at Mansur Ahmed.


Mansur Ahmed presents Vincent (a.k.a. Tim Burton) posted at Mansur Ahmed.




Mansur Ahmed presents Watchmen and the Works of Alan Moore posted at Mansur Ahmed.




Mansur Ahmed presents Will Superman Return…Again? posted at Mansur Ahmed.


Mansur Ahmed presents Michael Mann & the Interlacing Strings of Causality posted at Mansur Ahmed.


Mansur Ahmed presents Here Come The Basterds… posted at Mansur Ahmed.


Mansur Ahmed presents The Melancholy of Clint Eastwood posted at Mansur Ahmed.


Mansur Ahmed presents Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters posted at Mansur Ahmed.


All Things Film

Kevin Fleming presents Watch Lost Season 5 Episodes Online posted at Satellite TV Guru.


Jaynie Van Roe presents King Creole's Queen: Carolyn Jones posted at Here's Looking Like You, Kid, saying, "I just found your carnival -- please let me know if I submitted incorrectly. :)"


Jaynie Van Roe presents Many People Have Annie Hall All Wrong posted at Here's Looking Like You, Kid, saying, "If you ever need a host... :)"




Film Reviews

Jaynie Van Roe presents Here’s Looking Like You, Kid » Blog Archive » The Knack (And How To Get It) In Romance & Fashion posted at Here's Looking Like You, Kid, saying, "Please let me know if I'm only to submit one post per carnival!"

Vaprak presents Movie Review: Paul Blart: Mall Cop (2009) posted at The Critical Critics.






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Monday, January 19, 2009

Pajama Party Flick Picks-January 19, 2009


Welcome to the January 19, 2008 edition of Pajama Party Flick Picks.


Scott Davis presents Tron 2.0 Movie Updates and News posted at ZombieChatter.com.




Toni presents Veronika Decides to Die Movie Trailer posted at Wifely Steps, saying, "Another much-anticipated book-turned-movie. Coming out in March 2009."



Vaprak presents Movie Review: Punisher: War Zone (2008) posted at The Critical Critics.



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Sunday, January 18, 2009

Happy Birthday PJ's and a Movie!!!

In honor of the One Year Anniversary PJ's and a Movie I'm going to re-post the review that started it all! Cry It Out! With the Way We Were...

An All-American guy and a curly-haired complicated, woman meet, love and split. No I’m not talking about the latest teen-flick out in theaters. I’m referring to the penultimate break-up film, The Way We Were.

I first discovered this movie at the ripe old age of twelve. I was stuck in bed with a cold the night before Thanksgiving and couldn’t sleep. After a few minutes of channel surfing after midnight I caught the opening scene of this wonderfully heart-breaking film.

This film struck a cord with me even as I began my adolescence. I suppose it’s the true romantic in me that drew me into this film. When you’re a teen you have insecurities and you desperately hope you’ll find true love.

Barbra Streisand is over-achiever, Katie Morosky, who meets the handsome, intelligent, and sexy Hubbell Gardner, played by Robert Redford. The two are from totally different crowds while in college, but their paths constantly cross as Hubbell eats at the diner Katie works in at night. They also share a creative writing class where Hubbells’ natural talent shines, while Katie struggles to get her paper noticed.

The Way We Were honestly captures a relationship, without taking away the fantasy element of it all.

Why am I recommending this film? Because it’s good. It shows the development of a relationship between two people who seem different, but perfect for each other. You feel the pain when Katie is yelling at Hubbell to make him see no one will ever love him the way she does. He agrees, but says that it just got too hard because she expected him to be perfect.

Breaking-up sucks. There’s no nice way to do it. If you’re one of the few that actually works things out and gets back together, you’re in the minority. Usually break-ups are final. When you feel like dirt, can’t sleep at night, and wish your ex was there, it’s nice to watch a movie where someone is going through the same thing. True not all of the elements of The Way We Were are relatable, but you will know what it feels like to lose someone that meant a great deal to your life. Crying along with Barb and Bob may help you let out your own pain and realize you’re not the only one who was dumped for differences in politics, religion or need for personal appearances. If you’re anything like me you’ll enjoy the sappy love theme, whose words What's too painful to remember, We simply choose to forget, will help you remember the happier times and not the sad.



Monday, December 15, 2008

Pajama Party Flick Picks-December 15, 2008


Welcome to the December 15, 2008 edition of Pajama Party Flick Picks.


Scott Davis presents World War Z Latest News and Updates (set for 2010) posted at ZombieChatter.com.




Missy presents Audrey Tautou is Priceless posted at Observations from Missy's Window, saying, "Priceless, starring Audrey Tautou, is a French romantic comedy that is fun to watch."

Jon Swift presents The Triumph of Derrièrism posted at Jon Swift, saying, "Last year I identified an important new school of film criticism, which I called “derrièrism. This year it has triumphed."


Mansur Ahmed presents Reaching For the Stars On the Shoulders of Stanley Kubrick posted at Mansur Ahmed.




Byteful Travel presents Impressions of The Fountain posted at Byteful Blog, saying, "Writing about a movie in its afterglow, that time when the potency of its feeling is still fresh in one’s mind, is the best time to write about a movie. I was deeply touched by "The Fountain". One could see the film as the outline of every human’s struggle with death, humanity’s seeming inability to learn from its mistakes, or a love poem told in 12 chapters. Not all will enjoy this film for what it truly is because not all can appreciate the depth that it offers. But that’s fine, because we’re all learning together, anyway."



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